Harvest Report

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In case you have been wondering, harvest is rolling here in Missouri, and has been for a while. We started September 22 harvesting corn in a field located next to a creek. We call this our bottom ground. The yields were less than desirable and the corn was still a bit wet, (it had not dried all of the way down in the field) but we were needing to get the corn shelled so that drainage tile could be put in the ground. I will share pictures of that process soon.

After a breakdown and a day of waiting for parts, it was back to the corn field on high ground and higher yields. As farmers we like the yields to be high because that means we are doing our job well. Between working with our seed guy, (who happens to be my husband) the local chemical company, mother nature and each other, we can be good stewards of the land. We can ensure that the land is being used to its potential and that it will provide a crop that will go on to be food, fuel or family friendly products. This also ensures that the next generation will have viable land to farm also.

Filling the Truck

The yields on the hill ground have been good, considering the very wet spring and early summer that we had. You see corn does not like to have its roots in water. What I mean is that the roots need water, but they do not like sitting in water for long periods of time. In any low sports or terrace channels in the fields you had water sitting, and sitting and sitting. The corn did not like this. Yields have dropped drastically in these areas, thus bringing the field average down. With the addition of a yield monitor, we have been able to map the fields and get a real-time analysis of how the field performed. Spots in the fields are seeing high yields for our area, (200+ bushels to the acre), while the low spots are seeing way below average for our area, (50+/- bushels to the acre).

After getting our cash rent corn out, it was back to another piece of bottom land that once again saw very low corn averages. After the corn is planted and before it reaches a certain stage in growing and a certain height, you apply Nitrogen to the field to give the corn what it needs to continue green tissue development, ear and kernel development. (This is why I love Agronomists!! The whole process is mind-blowing!) This corn did not receive its Nitrogen when it needed it because of the wet conditions and it too had wet feet all spring and summer. Thus the less than desirable yields again. Never fear though! We will try again next year.

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Next came a short time in the soybean field. There was one 50 acre field that was planted earlier than the rest, with some replant acres, that was actually ready for harvest. This field was also slated for fall planting of wheat, so we needed to get the crop out. Once again we saw bare spots in the fields from all of the rain, but we do feel blessed in that there was a crop to harvest.

We are now back in the corn field with just a bit more to go before we take a break and let the soybeans finish maturing. As you may know, the weather has been perfect for harvesting and for drying crops in the field. We could use a rain to “settle the dust” and give the pastures a much-needed drink, but we also need the crops out and that is really hard to do in muddy conditions.

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There you have! Our Harvest Report so far for 2015. What will the rest of harvest bring? Who knows, but we do know that we will continue to do it together as a Missouri Farming Family.

Blessings to you this harvest season,

Laurie – Country Link

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2 comments on “Harvest Report

  1. Larry Strohbeck says:

    Great report, Laurie. You guys are the models for farming enthusiasm and excellence. Your attitude is outstanding and it is obvious that you love what you do. Congratulations to you and we wish you the best in the years ahead. Love you guys. The Strohs

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